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  • Different, not less: love of sports helps military child with autism

    “Strike! ... Ball! ... Strike!” With each call from the umpire, a vigilant statistician marks small tallies on a clipboard in the home dugout. Although he isn’t wearing a Tigers’ baseball uniform, he is representing his high school team by sporting a cardinal red baseball cap. Andy Martins is a 17-year-old sports enthusiast and one of the managers of the Warrensburg High School baseball team. Andy has autism. This is his second year on the team, and this season he is responsible for counting pitches.
  • Family bonds: more than blood

    With the rapid pace for Airmen, time can be their most valuable possession. There comes a moment when children enter the fray, it could be sports, choir or theater: the time one devotes to their kids resonates with them for the rest of their lives.
  • Making it together: husband and wife team promote, pin-on at same time

    Lt. Cols. Shane and Jennifer Garrison experience their second promotion together during a dual pin-on ceremony at Barksdale AFB, La., April 20. The couple are both E-3 Air Battle Managers assigned to Eighth Air Force; the Garrisons also pinned on major at the same time. They discussed the benefits and obstacles faced with dual military careers.
  • Youth behind the uniform: moving builds resiliency

    Being a child born into a military family may be challenging, but for one child in the Malmstrom community, he believes it’s another experience he can take with him wherever he goes.Fifth-grader Mason Duggan, son of Lt. Col. Jerrod Duggan, 341st Maintenance Group deputy commander, has moved four times since birth, with another move coming up this
  • Power in words: 509th CONS Airman communicates through poetry

    As he took the stage for the first time, he looked out into the audience and felt like a fish in a fishbowl. Even though the nerves were there, he felt prepared after spending two weeks memorizing his piece. The stage lights were shining in his face as everyone stared up at him, waiting for him to speak. The crowd grew quieter as the room became darker. He took a deep breath, and on an exhale he began to recite his work.
  • Feel the CBRNE

    “Alarm Red, MOPP level four!” the instructor yells to 30 students as he studies their reactions. The class of Airmen, noncommissioned officers and officers hastily apply their mission oriented protective posture gear. After carefully tightening their protective masks, donning hoods and pulling on gloves, they inspect each other to make sure no
  • New dorms to accommodate a growing Ellsworth

    The roar of heavy machinery, the clanging of hammers and the buzzing of saws is something commonly heard near the Jefferson dormitory. The noise starts before sunrise and continues after sunset. Workers assemble the buildings with speed, skill and steady hands in order to meet their deadline and provide Airmen a home away from home while they are stationed at Ellsworth Air Force Base.
  • Protecting the pearly whites: Dental clinic helps Airmen maintain readiness

    George Washington’s wooden teeth are a tall tale. Though a myth, this legend made people think about the importance of good dental hygiene. It also could have scared a child or two into brushing and flossing regularly – or risk wearing wooden teeth for eternity.
  • Bomber bros: taking the (atomic) Adams family to a new height

    Capts. Julien and Daniel Adams have a lot in common. They both have dark, short-cropped hair, love Korean food, and are alumni of the same university; however, the similarities don’t stop there. In fact, if surrounded by people who didn’t know them very well, the two could easily swap places for the day with nobody being the wiser – a fun perk of having an identical twin. In the Air Force, they are barely even separated by the airframes they fly on – bomber jets.
  • Ready, set, jump: 509th CES Airman’s skydiving passion

    Imagine flying in a small and tightly-packed plane 14,000 feet in the sky and hearing 1-2-3, jump! Without thinking, you’re suddenly free falling, feeling the wind hit your skin and getting a rush of adrenaline through your entire body. You pull the parachute open and are maneuvering yourself down to the ground. Carefully basing your movements on the wind direction and speed to ensure you land correctly.
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