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91SFG tests combat capabilities

An Airman from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron fires an M4 at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. During a three-day training event, Airmen completed a leadership reaction course, Humvee rollover training, virtual firing, live firing and a convoy course. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

An Airman from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron fires an M4 at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. During a three-day training event, Airmen completed a leadership reaction course, Humvee rollover training, virtual firing, live firing and a convoy course. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

An Airman from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron fires an M4 at a weapons training range at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. This range allows defenders stationed at Minot Air Force Base, N.D., to shoot targets at a distance of 300 m. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

An Airman from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron fires an M4 at a weapons training range at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. This range allows defenders stationed at Minot Air Force Base, N.D., to shoot targets at a distance of 300 m. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron fire their M4 at a weapons training range at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. Airmen were able to shoot pop-up targets from 50-300 m to replicate real-life distances. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron fire their M4 at a weapons training range at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. Airmen were able to shoot pop-up targets from 50-300 m to replicate real-life distances. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Staff Sgt. Matthew Cinciripini, a security forces instructor assigned to the 91st Security Support Squadron, monitors Airmen at a weapons training range at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. Live-fire training was one of many courses that were part of a three-day training event to prepare Airmen for real life scenarios and improve combat capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Staff Sgt. Matthew Cinciripini, a security forces instructor assigned to the 91st Security Support Squadron, monitors Airmen at a weapons training range at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. Live-fire training was one of many courses that were part of a three-day training event to prepare Airmen for real life scenarios and improve combat capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

An Airman from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron fires an M4 at a weapons training range at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. This range allows defenders stationed at Minot Air Force Base, N.D., to shoot targets at a distance of 300 m. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

An Airman from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron fires an M4 at a weapons training range at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. This range allows defenders stationed at Minot Air Force Base, N.D., to shoot targets at a distance of 300 m. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Senior Airman Daniel Connor, a security forces evaluator assigned to the 91st Security Forces Group, conducts Humvee rollover training at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The Humvee Egress Assistance Training teaches concepts and procedures, and increases survivability percentages for members involved in a roll-over accident. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Senior Airman Daniel Connor, a security forces evaluator assigned to the 91st Security Forces Group, conducts Humvee rollover training at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The Humvee Egress Assistance Training teaches concepts and procedures, and increases survivability percentages for members involved in a roll-over accident. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron use the U.S. Army’s Engagement Skills Trainer 2000 at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The EST 2000 is a firearms training simulator that allows Airmen to focus on firing position, breathing and sight alignment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron use the U.S. Army’s Engagement Skills Trainer 2000 at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The EST 2000 is a firearms training simulator that allows Airmen to focus on firing position, breathing and sight alignment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

An Airman from the 91st Security Forces Group practices during a firearms training simulator at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The U.S. Army’s Engagement Skills Trainer allows Airmen to fire in a relaxed environment and focus on the fundamentals of firing.(U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

An Airman from the 91st Security Forces Group practices during a firearms training simulator at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The U.S. Army’s Engagement Skills Trainer allows Airmen to fire in a relaxed environment and focus on the fundamentals of firing.(U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron use the U.S. Army’s Engagement Skills Trainer 2000 at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The EST 2000 is a firearms training simulator that allows Airmen to focus on firing position, breathing and sight alignment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron use the U.S. Army’s Engagement Skills Trainer 2000 at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The EST 2000 is a firearms training simulator that allows Airmen to focus on firing position, breathing and sight alignment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron participate in a leadership reaction course at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016.Various obstacles were presented to Airmen to increase communication and leadership within the unit. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)
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Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron participate in a leadership reaction course at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016.Various obstacles were presented to Airmen to increase communication and leadership within the unit. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron participate in a leadership reaction course at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The leadership reaction course, part of a three-day training event, taught team building and increased leadership skills. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)
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Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron participate in a leadership reaction course at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. The leadership reaction course, part of a three-day training event, taught team building and increased leadership skills. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron maneuver through an obstacle at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. This obstacle course increased leadership skills and communication throughout the unit. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)
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Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron maneuver through an obstacle at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. This obstacle course increased leadership skills and communication throughout the unit. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron maneuver through an obstacle at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. This obstacle course increased leadership skills and communication throughout the unit. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)
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Airmen from the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron maneuver through an obstacle at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, N.D., Sept. 7, 2016. This obstacle course increased leadership skills and communication throughout the unit. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman)

MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. --

Throughout the month of August, various units within the 91st Security Forces Group completed combat capability assurance training at the Camp Grafton Training Center in Devils Lake, North Dakota.

This training event was held to implement CCAT strategies to ensure a force capable of tactically deterring, denying and retaining government control of assigned nuclear capable resources in the face of all threats.

“After September 12th, we will have trained over 700 cops,” said Staff Sgt. Matthew Cinciripini, 91st Security Support Squadron security forces instructor.

The annual training event prepares Airmen for real life scenarios and improve combat capabilities. Airmen completed different training objectives to comply with annual home station training.

“The first day includes Humvee roll-over training, a leadership reaction course and a firearms training simulator,” Cinciripini said.

The Humvee egress assistance training, or HEAT, teaches concepts and procedures and increases survivability percentages for members involved in a roll-over accident, according to the 91st SFG operation order 16-003.

After completing the leadership reaction course to learn team-building and increase leadership skills, the Airmen completed a virtual M4 live fire proficiency through the use of the U.S. Army’s Engagement Skills Trainer 2000, which is a fire arms training simulator.

“The simulator allows us to focus on the fundamentals of firing without worrying about other factors like wind and distance,” said Senior Airman Nicholas Maxwell, 791st Missile Security Forces Squadron convoy response force member. “We are able to concentrate on breathing, trigger squeeze, sight alignment and shooting position in a more relaxed environment.”

During day two of the training event, Airmen completed a course to practice individual movement techniques and squad unit techniques by doing tactical maneuvers from one position to the next.

“This course helped us improve our distance determination between objectives,” Maxwell said.

After the convoy course, they further developed their Humvee driver skills by completing an off-road driving course and reaction drills. 

“We endure different weather conditions and driving conditions here at Minot, so anytime we can take an opportunity to get Airmen some advanced driving training, we do,” Cinciripini said.

The final day of training is full distance M4 firing on a U.S. Army range. With set courses of fire, Airmen are able to utilize their weapons from 50 to 300 meters.

“The live-fire training was the best part,” Maxwell said. “At the [Combat Arms Training and Maintenance] range here we can only shoot at 25 meter targets, so being able to shoot on a full range of 300 meters was very beneficial.”